Healing Mind And Soul With Aromatherapy

Flowers make our heart rejoice, rejuvenate and delight us in an astounding way. The sight of a well-trimmed garden lined with colorful flowers in bloom soothes our mind and seeps in warm energy into our body. The fragrance of the flowers-in-bloom filling up the spring breeze is bound to successfully drain away stress and anxiety in our lives. The fragrance of flowers brings in so much of optimism and sparkle in our otherwise daily and dull life. Owing to these universally experienced aspects of fragrances, the popularity of aromatherapy is growing worldwide and has led to a wide acceptance of aromatherapy. It is considered as a recommended method in the holistic approach of therapeutic, restorative and curative science.

The science of aromatherapy is an ancient practice that traces back to the former period of human civilization. In this form of natural therapy, natural oils extracted from flowers, barks of trees, stems, leaves, roots or other parts of a plant are used to alter a person’s mood, cognitive functions or health. This treatment is a part of alternate medicine that refrains from the use of chemical compounds and carries minute side-effects or toxins. Although scientific evidences are yet to prove the benefits of aromatherapy on the overall physiological and biochemical functions of the body, the influence of aroma on the brain, especially the limbic system through the olfactory system, is undeniable.

According to a research study carried out by Ohio State University, lemon oil aroma is believed to enhance a person’s mood and act as a good mind-relaxant. To name further examples, tea tree exhibits excellent anti-microbial properties and hence is widely used in the treatment of infectious diseases. Similarly, lavender oil shows excellent remedial properties in reducing insomnia and migraine.

These oils are highly concentrated forms of the plant extracts. Aromatherapy treatment oils can be inhaled, massaged onto the body, sprinkled in bath tubs or shower, burned or sprayed appropriately. Today, the rapid increase in the number of spas and other health centers in every nook and corner of the world is testament to the fact that aromatherapy has huge followers. Some of the most commonly used plant oils include:

� Geranium
� Tea tree
� Lavender
� Cedar wood
� Lemon
� Chamomile
� Eucalyptus
� Rosemary

Each of the above oils has a unique treatment purpose and quality. So if you are interested in using aromatherapy for your overall well-being, it is best to consult a professional aroma therapist. For instance, people who have high blood pressure should avoid rosemary, sage and thyme oils.